Urea

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How much does it cost?

Please note – In addition to the price of tests, there is also a phlebotomy cost for the withdrawal and handling of your sample. This is a standard charge across all clinics. The cost of sample handling is £50, but this is discounted to £30 only if paid in advance. Please choose the pay later option to pay the full amount upon your arrival at the clinic or choose pay now in order to pay in advance and secure the discounted fee.

MOST POPULAR
Urea
Measure your Urea levels only
Features:
  • Urea
MOST POPULAR
Kidney function test
An evaluation of your kidney function test that evaluates your waste products, electrolytes and eGFR.
Features:
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Bicarbonate
  • Chloride
  • Urea
  • Creatinine
  • eGFR

How does it work?

1

Find your test(s)

Browse our tests and profiles. If the test you are looking for is not on our website, contact us for more information. We have 1000+ tests.

2

Book an appointment

Click “book now” & select the date and time. If you do not know which test you need, or if you need multiple tests, select “general appointment”. Pay for your appointment in advance & save £20 on phlebotomy fees.

3

Visit our clinic

Upon arrival at the clinic, our staff will confirm your test selection, and take the samples required to provide you your reports.

4

Receive your results

After analysing your sample in our lab, you will receive a PDF report by email. Most results are available within 24 hours.

What is a kidney function test?

A kidney function test tells you how well your kidneys are functioning. If your kidneys aren’t working effectively, levels of waste products and toxins can build up in your blood. This test measures the levels of electrolytes and waste products — creatinine and urea. If your levels are higher than expected, this could indicate a problem with your kidneys. This test also calculates your estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), which shows you how well your kidneys are filtering waste products from your blood. It can indicate if you’re likely to have kidney disease, and if so, its estimated stage.

What can I test?

Urea

Urea is a waste product produced by the body when it breaks down proteins in the liver. Once the urea is made, it is transported to the kidneys, which filter it out of the blood and remove it from the body in the form of urine. Measuring the levels of urea in the blood can therefore reflect how well both the liver and the kidneys, are functioning. It is important to note that even if one kidney is severely damaged but the other is functioning perfectly, results may still return as normal.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a chemical waste molecule that is generated from normal muscle metabolism. Measurement of this is an indicator of the levels of other waste products in the body. Creatinine is also an accurate marker of kidney function, and may help in diagnosing kidney disease.

Sodium

Sodium is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It helps to regulate the water and electrolyte balance of the body, and is therefore an important factor in blood pressure and pH. It also plays an important role in the function of nerves and muscles. Sodium levels in the blood are regulated by the kidneys.

Potassium

Potassium is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It is essential for maintaining the electrical activity of the heart and for proper muscle function. It also plays a crucial role in nerve signaling and helps regulate fluid balance, pH levels, and blood pressure within the body. Too much or too little potassium in the blood can have serious consequences, including irregular heart rhythms. Potassium levels in the blood are regulated by the kidneys, and imbalances may arise from kidney disorders, certain medications, or other medical conditions.

Chloride

Chloride is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It primarily resides in the extracellular fluid and works closely with sodium to help regulate the balance of fluids in and out of cells, maintaining osmotic pressure. Chloride is also vital for acid-base balance, serving as a primary anion to buffer the blood's pH. In addition, it plays a role in digestion, as hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach aids in breaking down food. Chloride levels in the blood are regulated by the kidneys. Imbalances, either too much or too little chloride, can arise from various conditions, including kidney diseases, prolonged vomiting, or certain medications.

Bicarbonate

Bicarbonate is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It plays a pivotal role in maintaining the body's acid-base balance, acting as the primary buffer in the bloodstream. By doing so, bicarbonate helps stabilize the pH of the blood, ensuring that it remains slightly alkaline, which is essential for optimal cellular function. Additionally, bicarbonate assists in the transport of carbon dioxide from peripheral tissues to the lungs for exhalation. Bicarbonate levels in the blood are primarily regulated by the kidneys, which reabsorb and excrete it based on the body's needs. Imbalances in bicarbonate can indicate metabolic acidosis or alkalosis, conditions that arise from various underlying causes such as renal disorders, respiratory diseases, or an imbalance in electrolytes.

eGFR

The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) assesses how well the kidneys are working by estimating the amount of blood filtered through the kidneys. The glomeruli are tiny filters in the kidneys responsible for removing waste products. If these filters do not do their job properly, kidney function can be impaired. The eGFR calculation is an estimate of actual glomerular filtration rate, calculated using your age, gender, ethnicity, and serum creatinine levels.

Urea

Urea is a waste product produced by the body when it breaks down proteins in the liver. Once the urea is made, it is transported to the kidneys, which filter it out of the blood and remove it from the body in the form of urine. Measuring the levels of urea in the blood can therefore reflect how well both the liver and the kidneys, are functioning. It is important to note that even if one kidney is severely damaged but the other is functioning perfectly, results may still return as normal.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a chemical waste molecule that is generated from normal muscle metabolism. Measurement of this is an indicator of the levels of other waste products in the body. Creatinine is also an accurate marker of kidney function, and may help in diagnosing kidney disease.

Sodium

Sodium is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It helps to regulate the water and electrolyte balance of the body, and is therefore an important factor in blood pressure and pH. It also plays an important role in the function of nerves and muscles. Sodium levels in the blood are regulated by the kidneys.

Potassium

Potassium is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It is essential for maintaining the electrical activity of the heart and for proper muscle function. It also plays a crucial role in nerve signaling and helps regulate fluid balance, pH levels, and blood pressure within the body. Too much or too little potassium in the blood can have serious consequences, including irregular heart rhythms. Potassium levels in the blood are regulated by the kidneys, and imbalances may arise from kidney disorders, certain medications, or other medical conditions.

Chloride

Chloride is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It primarily resides in the extracellular fluid and works closely with sodium to help regulate the balance of fluids in and out of cells, maintaining osmotic pressure. Chloride is also vital for acid-base balance, serving as a primary anion to buffer the blood's pH. In addition, it plays a role in digestion, as hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach aids in breaking down food. Chloride levels in the blood are regulated by the kidneys. Imbalances, either too much or too little chloride, can arise from various conditions, including kidney diseases, prolonged vomiting, or certain medications.

Bicarbonate

Bicarbonate is both an electrolyte and a mineral. It plays a pivotal role in maintaining the body's acid-base balance, acting as the primary buffer in the bloodstream. By doing so, bicarbonate helps stabilize the pH of the blood, ensuring that it remains slightly alkaline, which is essential for optimal cellular function. Additionally, bicarbonate assists in the transport of carbon dioxide from peripheral tissues to the lungs for exhalation. Bicarbonate levels in the blood are primarily regulated by the kidneys, which reabsorb and excrete it based on the body's needs. Imbalances in bicarbonate can indicate metabolic acidosis or alkalosis, conditions that arise from various underlying causes such as renal disorders, respiratory diseases, or an imbalance in electrolytes.

eGFR

The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) assesses how well the kidneys are working by estimating the amount of blood filtered through the kidneys. The glomeruli are tiny filters in the kidneys responsible for removing waste products. If these filters do not do their job properly, kidney function can be impaired. The eGFR calculation is an estimate of actual glomerular filtration rate, calculated using your age, gender, ethnicity, and serum creatinine levels.

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How do i find you?

Patient reception

Our patient reception is located at 42 Foley Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 7TS

Walking distance from Oxford Circus & a number of other underground stations.

Opening hours

Our opening hours are:

Monday to Friday

9.30AM - 7PM

Weekends

Appointment only

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