Myeloma Screen

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How much does it cost?

Please note – In addition to the price of tests, there is also a phlebotomy cost for the withdrawal and handling of your sample. This is a standard charge across all clinics. The cost of sample handling is £50, but this is discounted to £30 only if paid in advance. Please choose the pay later option to pay the full amount upon your arrival at the clinic or choose pay now in order to pay in advance and secure the discounted fee.

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Myeloma Screen
Check for Myeloma
Features:
  • Full Blood Count
  • ESR
  • Protein Electrophoresis
  • Immunoglobulins
  • Bence-Jone Protein
  • Kidney Function Tests
  • Liver Function Tests
  • Cardiac/Muscle Enzymes
  • Bone Markers
  • Glucose
  • Triglycerides
  • Cholesterol
  • Iron
  • TIBC

How does it work?

1

Find your test(s)

Browse our tests and profiles. If the test you are looking for is not on our website, contact us for more information. We have 1000+ tests.

2

Book an appointment

Click “book now” & select the date and time. If you do not know which test you need, or if you need multiple tests, select “general appointment”. Pay for your appointment in advance & save £20 on phlebotomy fees.

3

Visit our clinic

Upon arrival at the clinic, our staff will confirm your test selection, and take the samples required to provide you your reports.

4

Receive your results

After analysing your sample in our lab, you will receive a PDF report by email. Most results are available within 24 hours.

What is Myeloma?

Myeloma is a type of blood cancer that develops from cells in the bone marrow called plasma cells. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside the inner part of some of our large bones.

What can I test?

Full Blood Count

Red cells are vital for transporting oxygen around the body, and anything that affects their ability to do so can lead to symptoms, including fatigue. An FBC looks at the size, shape, and volume of your red blood cells and will help assess whether you are suffering from anaemia, either caused by a deficiency in iron or vitamin B12. White blood cells are key to supporting your body's immune system and can indicate whether you are suffering from or have recently suffered from an injury or infection.

ESR

ESR (Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate) is a non-specific marker of inflammation and indirectly measures inflammation levels in the body. Our blood test measures the rate red blood cells fall in a tall, thin tube. Normally, red blood cells fall slowly and leave little clear plasma within the tube. Increased levels of some proteins, such as fibrinogen or immunoglobulins, which are both increased in inflammation, cause the red blood cells to fall quicker, which increases the ESR result.

Protein electrophoresis

Immunoglobulins

Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies are produced as a first response to a new non-self antigen, providing short-term protection. Then, immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are produced during the initial infection. Around 70-80% of the immunoglobulins in the blood are IgG, and your body retains a catalogue of these antibodies to rapidly reproduce them whenever exposed to the same antigen. IgG antibodies form the basis of long-term protection against microorganisms. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies comprise about 15% of the total lung and stomach secretions and breast milk. IgA protects against infection in mucosal areas of the body, which are the soft tissue that lines your body's canals and organs in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems.

Bence-Jones Protein

Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when your body makes too many antibodies, the level of light chains also rises. Bence-Jones proteins are small enough to be filtered out by the kidneys. The proteins then spill into the urine.

Kidney Function Tests

The Kidney Blood Test can tell you how well your kidneys are functioning. If your kidneys aren’t working effectively, levels of waste products and toxins can build up in your blood. This test measures the levels of two waste products — creatinine and urea. If your levels are higher than expected, this could indicate a problem with your kidneys. Your test results also include a calculation of your estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This is based on your creatinine level alongside your age, sex, and body size. Your eGFR shows you how well your kidneys are filtering waste products from your blood. It can indicate if you’re likely to have kidney disease, and if so, its estimated stage.

Liver Function Tests

The Liver Blood Test is a liver function test that looks at liver enzymes, such as gamma GT (GGT) and alanine transferase (ALT), to indicate how well your liver is functioning and whether it’s showing signs of inflammation. In its early stages, liver damage is usually reversible, which is why it’s important to spot signs of liver damage early.

Cardiac/ Muscle Enzymes

Creatine kinase ― also known as creatine phosphokinase, or CPK ― is a muscle enzyme that exists as isoenzymes. The MB type is specific to myocardial cells, whereas MM and BB are specific to skeletal muscle and brain tissue, respectively. The CK level increases approximately 3 to 4 hours after MI and remains elevated for 3 to 4 days. Lactate dehydrogenase is an enzyme that the body uses during the process of turning sugar into energy for your cells to use. LDH is found in many of the body's tissues and organs, including the muscles, liver, heart, pancreas, kidneys, brain and blood cells.

Bone Markers

Bone markers are blood and urine tests that detect products of bone remodeling to help determine if the rate of bone resorption and/or formation is abnormally increased, suggesting a potential bone disorder. The markers can be used to help determine a person’s risk of bone fracture and to monitor drug therapy for people receiving treatment for bone disorders, such as osteoporosis, which is marked by decreased bone density and mass, and Paget disease, a disorder marked by excessive bone breakdown and regrowth.

Glucose

Glucose is a sugar that acts as the body's main source of energy. Most of the body's cells require glucose for energy production. The brain and nervous system cells can only function when glucose levels in the blood remain within a certain range. The hormone insulin controls the transport of glucose into the body's cells to be used as energy. We cannot live without glucose or insulin and they must be in balance. It is important that blood glucose levels remains fairly stable as severe high or low levels can be life threatening.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) that circulate in the blood. After you eat, your body converts excess calories (whether from fat or carbohydrates) into triglycerides which are then transported to cells to be stored as fat. Your body then releases triglycerides when required for energy.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol is an essential fat (lipid) in the body. Although it has a bad reputation it has some important functions, including building cell membranes and producing a number of essential hormones including testosterone and oestradiol. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and also comes from the food we eat. Although there are a number of different types of cholesterol, the two main components of total cholesterol are HDL (high density lipoprotein) which is protective against heart disease and LDL (low density lipoprotein) which, in high levels, can contribute to cardiovascular disease. Your total cholesterol result on its own is of limited value in understanding your risk of heart disease; high levels of HDL cholesterol can cause a raised total cholesterol result but may actually be protective against heart disease. Equally, you can have a normal total cholesterol level but have low levels of protective HDL cholesterol. The most important factors are how much HDL and LDL cholesterol you have, and what proportion of your total cholesterol is made up of protective HDL cholesterol. We give a detailed breakdown of the components of your total cholesterol in the rest of this cholesterol profile.

Iron

Iron is a mineral that is essential for life. It is a component of haemoglobin, a protein in our red blood cells that is responsible for transporting oxygen around our body. If we don't have enough iron, our haemoglobin levels fall and we can't get sufficient oxygen to our cells. This can cause symptoms which include fatigue, dizziness, and shortness of breath. Serum iron is a very transient reading and can be influenced by the amount of iron-rich food in your diet in the days before your blood test. For this reason, iron is rarely looked at on its own, and is interpreted alongside other markers in an iron status test.

Total Iron Binding

Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) is a measure of the ability of your body to efficiently carry iron through the blood.

Full Blood Count

Red cells are vital for transporting oxygen around the body, and anything that affects their ability to do so can lead to symptoms, including fatigue. An FBC looks at the size, shape, and volume of your red blood cells and will help assess whether you are suffering from anaemia, either caused by a deficiency in iron or vitamin B12. White blood cells are key to supporting your body's immune system and can indicate whether you are suffering from or have recently suffered from an injury or infection.

ESR

ESR (Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate) is a non-specific marker of inflammation and indirectly measures inflammation levels in the body. Our blood test measures the rate red blood cells fall in a tall, thin tube. Normally, red blood cells fall slowly and leave little clear plasma within the tube. Increased levels of some proteins, such as fibrinogen or immunoglobulins, which are both increased in inflammation, cause the red blood cells to fall quicker, which increases the ESR result.

Protein electrophoresis

Immunoglobulins

Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies are produced as a first response to a new non-self antigen, providing short-term protection. Then, immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are produced during the initial infection. Around 70-80% of the immunoglobulins in the blood are IgG, and your body retains a catalogue of these antibodies to rapidly reproduce them whenever exposed to the same antigen. IgG antibodies form the basis of long-term protection against microorganisms. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies comprise about 15% of the total lung and stomach secretions and breast milk. IgA protects against infection in mucosal areas of the body, which are the soft tissue that lines your body's canals and organs in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems.

Bence-Jones Protein

Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when your body makes too many antibodies, the level of light chains also rises. Bence-Jones proteins are small enough to be filtered out by the kidneys. The proteins then spill into the urine.

Kidney Function Tests

The Kidney Blood Test can tell you how well your kidneys are functioning. If your kidneys aren’t working effectively, levels of waste products and toxins can build up in your blood. This test measures the levels of two waste products — creatinine and urea. If your levels are higher than expected, this could indicate a problem with your kidneys. Your test results also include a calculation of your estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This is based on your creatinine level alongside your age, sex, and body size. Your eGFR shows you how well your kidneys are filtering waste products from your blood. It can indicate if you’re likely to have kidney disease, and if so, its estimated stage.

Liver Function Tests

The Liver Blood Test is a liver function test that looks at liver enzymes, such as gamma GT (GGT) and alanine transferase (ALT), to indicate how well your liver is functioning and whether it’s showing signs of inflammation. In its early stages, liver damage is usually reversible, which is why it’s important to spot signs of liver damage early.

Cardiac/ Muscle Enzymes

Creatine kinase ― also known as creatine phosphokinase, or CPK ― is a muscle enzyme that exists as isoenzymes. The MB type is specific to myocardial cells, whereas MM and BB are specific to skeletal muscle and brain tissue, respectively. The CK level increases approximately 3 to 4 hours after MI and remains elevated for 3 to 4 days. Lactate dehydrogenase is an enzyme that the body uses during the process of turning sugar into energy for your cells to use. LDH is found in many of the body's tissues and organs, including the muscles, liver, heart, pancreas, kidneys, brain and blood cells.

Bone Markers

Bone markers are blood and urine tests that detect products of bone remodeling to help determine if the rate of bone resorption and/or formation is abnormally increased, suggesting a potential bone disorder. The markers can be used to help determine a person’s risk of bone fracture and to monitor drug therapy for people receiving treatment for bone disorders, such as osteoporosis, which is marked by decreased bone density and mass, and Paget disease, a disorder marked by excessive bone breakdown and regrowth.

Glucose

Glucose is a sugar that acts as the body's main source of energy. Most of the body's cells require glucose for energy production. The brain and nervous system cells can only function when glucose levels in the blood remain within a certain range. The hormone insulin controls the transport of glucose into the body's cells to be used as energy. We cannot live without glucose or insulin and they must be in balance. It is important that blood glucose levels remains fairly stable as severe high or low levels can be life threatening.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) that circulate in the blood. After you eat, your body converts excess calories (whether from fat or carbohydrates) into triglycerides which are then transported to cells to be stored as fat. Your body then releases triglycerides when required for energy.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol is an essential fat (lipid) in the body. Although it has a bad reputation it has some important functions, including building cell membranes and producing a number of essential hormones including testosterone and oestradiol. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and also comes from the food we eat. Although there are a number of different types of cholesterol, the two main components of total cholesterol are HDL (high density lipoprotein) which is protective against heart disease and LDL (low density lipoprotein) which, in high levels, can contribute to cardiovascular disease. Your total cholesterol result on its own is of limited value in understanding your risk of heart disease; high levels of HDL cholesterol can cause a raised total cholesterol result but may actually be protective against heart disease. Equally, you can have a normal total cholesterol level but have low levels of protective HDL cholesterol. The most important factors are how much HDL and LDL cholesterol you have, and what proportion of your total cholesterol is made up of protective HDL cholesterol. We give a detailed breakdown of the components of your total cholesterol in the rest of this cholesterol profile.

Iron

Iron is a mineral that is essential for life. It is a component of haemoglobin, a protein in our red blood cells that is responsible for transporting oxygen around our body. If we don't have enough iron, our haemoglobin levels fall and we can't get sufficient oxygen to our cells. This can cause symptoms which include fatigue, dizziness, and shortness of breath. Serum iron is a very transient reading and can be influenced by the amount of iron-rich food in your diet in the days before your blood test. For this reason, iron is rarely looked at on its own, and is interpreted alongside other markers in an iron status test.

Total Iron Binding

Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) is a measure of the ability of your body to efficiently carry iron through the blood.

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How do i find you?

Patient reception

Our patient reception is located at 42 Foley Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 7TS

Walking distance from Oxford Circus & a number of other underground stations.

Opening hours

Our opening hours are:

Monday to Friday

9.30AM - 7PM

Weekends

Appointment only

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