Miscarriage/Thrombotic Risk Profile

Book Now

How much does it cost?

Please note – In addition to the price of tests, there is also a phlebotomy cost for the withdrawal and handling of your sample. This is a standard charge across all clinics. The cost of sample handling is Ā£50, but this is discounted to Ā£30 only if paid in advance. Please choose the pay later option to pay the full amount upon your arrival at the clinic or choose pay now in order to pay in advance and secure the discounted fee.

MOST POPULAR
Miscarriage/Thrombotic Risk Profile
ur risk of recurrent Thrombotic Miscarriage
Features:
  • Full Blood Count
  • Coagulation Profile
  • Antithrombin III
  • Factor V Leiden
  • Factor II Prothrombin Gene
  • MTHFR Gene
  • Lupus Anticoagulant
  • Protein C
  • Free Protein S Antigen
  • Anticardiolipin Antibodies

How does it work?

1

Find your test(s)

Browse our tests and profiles. If the test you are looking for is not on our website, contact us for more information. We have 1000+ tests.

2

Book an appointment

Click “book now”Ā & select the date and time. If you do not know which test you need, or if you need multiple tests, select “general appointment”. Pay for your appointment in advance & save Ā£20 on phlebotomy fees.

3

Visit our clinic

Upon arrival at the clinic, our staff will confirm your test selection, and take the samples required to provide you your reports.

4

Receive your results

After analysing your sample in our lab, you will receive a PDF report by email. Most results are available within 24 hours.

What can I learn from this test?

Recurrent Miscarriage Thrombotic Profile is a batch of blood tests looking for thrombotic risk factors in women who have had a miscarriage or recurrent miscarriage. Treatment with heparin (Clexane, Tinzaparin, Enoxaparin), Aspirin or Folic Acid may improve the outcome in a subsequent pregnancy.

What can I test?

Full Blood Count

Red cells are vital for transporting oxygen around the body, and anything that affects their ability to do so can lead to symptoms, including fatigue. An FBC looks at the size, shape, and volume of your red blood cells and will help assess whether you are suffering from anaemia, either caused by a deficiency in iron or vitamin B12. White blood cells are key to supporting your body's immune system and can indicate whether you are suffering from or have recently suffered from an injury or infection.

Coagulation Profile

The Coagulation screen is used in many scenarios including as a pre-operative screen to assess bleeding risk, monitor bleeding conditions and some therapies, and also to assess patients demonstrating a bleeding/bruising history or a thrombosis history or that have a family history of bleeding/bruising.

Antithrombin III

Antithrombin III is a protein in the blood that blocks abnormal blood clots from forming. It helps the body keep a healthy balance between bleeding and clotting. Congenital antithrombin III deficiency is an inherited disease. It occurs when a person receives one abnormal copy of the antithrombin III gene from a parent with the disease.

Factor V Leiden Gene

Factor V Leiden (FAK-tur five LIDE-n) is a mutation of one of the clotting factors in the blood. This mutation can increase your chance of developing abnormal blood clots, most commonly in your legs or lungs. Most people with factor V Leiden never develop abnormal clots. But in people who do, these abnormal clots can lead to long-term health problems or become life-threatening.

Factor II Prothrombin Gene

Factor II deficiency is a very rare blood clotting disorder. It results in excessive or prolonged bleeding after an injury or surgery. Factor II, also known as prothrombin, is a protein made in your liver. It plays an essential role in blood clot formation (coagulation).

MTHFR Gene

A MTHFR gene test uses a sample of your blood to look for two very common changes in a gene called MTHFR. A change in this gene is also called an MTHFR variant or MTHFR mutation. Genes are parts of DNA in your cells that you inherit from your parents. Genes carry information that controls what you look like and how your body works.

Lupus Anticoagulant

Lupus anticoagulants cause clotting disorders that can lead to gangrene, miscarriages, strokes, and other problems. The lupus anticoagulant test measures the level of those antibodies in your body.

Protein C

Protein C deficiency is a rare disorder that increases your risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Protein C deficiency can be inherited or be the result of other conditions. Many people with the disorder donā€™t have symptoms and donā€™t require treatment. If treatment is needed, a blood-thinning drug can be prescribed.

Free Protein S Antigen

Protein S deficiency is a rare clotting problem that you can inherit from your parents. Many people with this deficiency donā€™t get a dangerous blood clot, but others can have a deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

Anticardiolipin Antibodies

Antiphospholipid antibodies are antibodies directed against phosphorus-fat components of your cell membranes called phospholipids, certain blood proteins that bind with phospholipids, and the complexes formed when proteins and phospholipids bind. Approximately 50% of people with lupus possesses these antibodies, and over a twenty-year period of time, one half of lupus patients with one of these antibodiesā€”the lupus anticoagulantā€”will experience a blood clot. People without lupus can also have antiphospholipid antibodies.

Full Blood Count

Red cells are vital for transporting oxygen around the body, and anything that affects their ability to do so can lead to symptoms, including fatigue. An FBC looks at the size, shape, and volume of your red blood cells and will help assess whether you are suffering from anaemia, either caused by a deficiency in iron or vitamin B12. White blood cells are key to supporting your body's immune system and can indicate whether you are suffering from or have recently suffered from an injury or infection.

Coagulation Profile

The Coagulation screen is used in many scenarios including as a pre-operative screen to assess bleeding risk, monitor bleeding conditions and some therapies, and also to assess patients demonstrating a bleeding/bruising history or a thrombosis history or that have a family history of bleeding/bruising.

Antithrombin III

Antithrombin III is a protein in the blood that blocks abnormal blood clots from forming. It helps the body keep a healthy balance between bleeding and clotting. Congenital antithrombin III deficiency is an inherited disease. It occurs when a person receives one abnormal copy of the antithrombin III gene from a parent with the disease.

Factor V Leiden Gene

Factor V Leiden (FAK-tur five LIDE-n) is a mutation of one of the clotting factors in the blood. This mutation can increase your chance of developing abnormal blood clots, most commonly in your legs or lungs. Most people with factor V Leiden never develop abnormal clots. But in people who do, these abnormal clots can lead to long-term health problems or become life-threatening.

Factor II Prothrombin Gene

Factor II deficiency is a very rare blood clotting disorder. It results in excessive or prolonged bleeding after an injury or surgery. Factor II, also known as prothrombin, is a protein made in your liver. It plays an essential role in blood clot formation (coagulation).

MTHFR Gene

A MTHFR gene test uses a sample of your blood to look for two very common changes in a gene called MTHFR. A change in this gene is also called an MTHFR variant or MTHFR mutation. Genes are parts of DNA in your cells that you inherit from your parents. Genes carry information that controls what you look like and how your body works.

Lupus Anticoagulant

Lupus anticoagulants cause clotting disorders that can lead to gangrene, miscarriages, strokes, and other problems. The lupus anticoagulant test measures the level of those antibodies in your body.

Protein C

Protein C deficiency is a rare disorder that increases your risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Protein C deficiency can be inherited or be the result of other conditions. Many people with the disorder donā€™t have symptoms and donā€™t require treatment. If treatment is needed, a blood-thinning drug can be prescribed.

Free Protein S Antigen

Protein S deficiency is a rare clotting problem that you can inherit from your parents. Many people with this deficiency donā€™t get a dangerous blood clot, but others can have a deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

Anticardiolipin Antibodies

Antiphospholipid antibodies are antibodies directed against phosphorus-fat components of your cell membranes called phospholipids, certain blood proteins that bind with phospholipids, and the complexes formed when proteins and phospholipids bind. Approximately 50% of people with lupus possesses these antibodies, and over a twenty-year period of time, one half of lupus patients with one of these antibodiesā€”the lupus anticoagulantā€”will experience a blood clot. People without lupus can also have antiphospholipid antibodies.

What do the reviews say?

How do i find you?

Patient reception

Our patient reception is located at 42 Foley Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 7TS

Walking distance from Oxford Circus & a number of other underground stations.

Opening hours

Our opening hours are:

Monday to Friday

9.30AM - 7PM

Weekends

Appointment only

Book Now