Erectile Dysfunction Profile

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How much does it cost?

Please note – In addition to the price of tests, there is also a phlebotomy cost for the withdrawal and handling of your sample. This is a standard charge across all clinics. The cost of sample handling is £50, but this is discounted to £30 only if paid in advance. Please choose the pay later option to pay the full amount upon your arrival at the clinic or choose pay now in order to pay in advance and secure the discounted fee.

MOST POPULAR
Erectile Dysfunction Profile
The Erectile Dysfunction Profile (ED) is a set of hormone blood tests that focus on identifying any hormone imbalance, as well as symptoms of infertility and erectile dysfunction, all used to investigate the conditions that can lead to male infertility. Causes of ED can be physical, psychological, traumatic or a side effect of certain medications.
Features:
  • Lipid panel
  • Glucose
  • Haemoglobin A1c (HBA1c)
  • Thyroid profile 1 (FT4, TSH)
  • Prolactin
  • Testosterone (Free)
  • Prostate specific antigen (PSA)
  • Sex hormone binding globulin level (SHBG)
  • Testosterone
  • Androstenedione
MOST POPULAR
Lipid panel
A full lipid panel
Features:
  • Cholesterol
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Non-HDL Cholesterol
  • Cholesterol:HDL ratio
  • Triglycerides
  • HbA1c
  • Glucose

How does it work?

1

Find your test(s)

Browse our tests and profiles. If the test you are looking for is not on our website, contact us for more information. We have 1000+ tests.

2

Book an appointment

Click “book now” & select the date and time. If you do not know which test you need, or if you need multiple tests, select “general appointment”. Pay for your appointment in advance & save £20 on phlebotomy fees.

3

Visit our clinic

Upon arrival at the clinic, our staff will confirm your test selection, and take the samples required to provide you your reports.

4

Receive your results

After analysing your sample in our lab, you will receive a PDF report by email. Most results are available within 24 hours.

What is Erectile Dysfunction?

Erectile dysfunction (or impotence) is when you’re either unable to get an erection or keep an erection for long enough to have sex. Sometimes you might also have a low sex drive (loss of libido). Occasional ED is very common and is usually nothing to worry about. It’s often caused by a short-term issue such as stress or drinking too much alcohol. However, for some men, ED can become a long-term problem. This can be very distressing and not only impact your sex life but could also affect your confidence and self-esteem.

What can I test?

Lipid Panel

A lipid profile looks into your cholesterol status, including your good (HDL) and bad (non-HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. The ratio of these fatty substances is a great first step in assessing your risk of cardiovascular disease (heart attacks and strokes). You can also use our test to monitor how simple lifestyle changes can reduce your risk over time. Cholesterol, known as a lipid, is a fatty substance in your blood. It plays an essential role in how your cells work, and in making vitamin D, bile acid, and vital hormones, such as testosterone and oestrogen.

Glucose

Glucose is a sugar that acts as the body's main source of energy. Most of the body's cells require glucose for energy production. The brain and nervous system cells can only function when glucose levels in the blood remain within a certain range. The hormone insulin controls the transport of glucose into the body's cells to be used as energy. We cannot live without glucose or insulin and they must be in balance. It is important that blood glucose levels remains fairly stable as severe high or low levels can be life threatening.

HbA1c

Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), also known as glycated haemoglobin, is a longer term measure of glucose levels in your blood than a simple blood glucose test. Glucose attaches itself to the haemoglobin in your red blood cells, and as your cells live for around 12-16 weeks, it gives us a good indication of the average level of sugar in your blood over a 3 month period.

Free T4

Thyroxine (T4) is one of two hormones produced by the thyroid gland. It works to speed up the rate of your metabolism. Most T4 is bound to carrier proteins in the blood - it is only the free, or unbound, T4 that is active in the body, which is measured in this test. Free T4 is the less active of the two main thyroid hormones. To have an impact on your cells it needs to convert to the more active T3 when your body needs it.

TSH

Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland in order to regulate the production of thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) by the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormones in the blood are low, then more TSH is produced to stimulate the thyroid gland to produce more of them. If thyroid hormone levels are high, then the pituitary produces less TSH to slow the production of thyroid hormones. If TSH is too high or too low, it normally signifies that there is a problem with the thyroid gland which is causing it to under or over produce thyroid hormones. Sometimes a disorder of the pituitary gland can also cause abnormal TSH levels.

Prolactin

Prolactin is a hormone which is produced in the pituitary gland and plays a role in reproductive health. Its primary purpose is to stimulate milk production after childbirth, and in pregnant and breastfeeding women prolactin levels can soar.

Testosterone

Testosterone is a hormone that causes male characteristics. For men, it helps to regulate sex drive and has a role in controlling bone mass, fat distribution, muscle mass, strength and the production of red blood cells and sperm. Testosterone is produced in the testicles of men and, in much smaller amounts, in the ovaries of women. Testosterone levels in men naturally decline after the age of 30, although lower than normal levels can occur at any age and can cause low libido, erectile dysfunction, difficulty in gaining and maintaining muscle mass and lack of energy. Although women have much lower amounts of testosterone than men, it is important for much the same reasons, playing a role in libido, the distribution of muscle and fat and the formation of red blood cells. All laboratories will slightly differ in the reference ranges they apply because they are based on the population they are testing. The normal range is set so that 95% of men will fall into it. For greater consistency, we use the guidance from the British Society for Sexual Medicine (BSSM) which advises that low testosterone can be diagnosed when testosterone is consistently below the reference range, and that levels below 12 nmol/L could also be considered low, especially in men who also report symptoms of low testosterone or who have low levels of free testosterone.

Free Testosterone

Most testosterone circulating in the blood is bound to proteins, in particular SHBG and albumin; only 2-3 % of testosterone is free and available to cells. This test uses an algorithm to calculate the level of free or unbound testosterone in relation to total testosterone, SHBG and albumin.

FAI

The free androgen index (FAI) is a calculation used to determine the amount of testosterone which is free (unbound) in the bloodstream. Most testosterone is bound to proteins sex hormone binding globulin and albumin and is not available to interact with the body's cells. The FAI is a calculation based on the ratio of testosterone and SHBG and is a measure of the amount of testosterone that is available to act on the body's tissues. The free androgen index is used in women to assess the likelihood of polycystic ovarian syndrome. In men, free testosterone gives a better indication of testosterone status.

PSA

Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is a protein which is released into the blood by the prostate gland. Prostate cancer can raise PSA levels but a PSA test in isolation is not to be relied upon to diagnose prostate cancer, as levels can be raised in benign prostate disorders (a false positive). There is also the potential for PSA levels to be normal despite the presence of prostate cancer, this is called a false negative.

SHBG

SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin) is a protein which transports the sex hormones (testosterone, oestrogen and dihydrotestosterone (DHT)) in the blood.Hormones which are bound to SHBG are inactive which means that they are unavailable to your cells. Measuring the level of SHBG in your blood gives important information about your levels of free or unbound hormones which are biologically active and available for use.

Androstenedione

Androstenedione is an androgen that is responsible for the onset of sexual differentiation in males and females as well as the development of secondary male physical characteristics such as facial hair and a deep voice . It is present in the blood of both men and women and is a precursor that can be converted by the body into more potent androgens, such as testosterone, or converted into the female hormone Oestrogen. This test measures the amount of androstenedione in the blood.

Lipid Panel

A lipid profile looks into your cholesterol status, including your good (HDL) and bad (non-HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. The ratio of these fatty substances is a great first step in assessing your risk of cardiovascular disease (heart attacks and strokes). You can also use our test to monitor how simple lifestyle changes can reduce your risk over time. Cholesterol, known as a lipid, is a fatty substance in your blood. It plays an essential role in how your cells work, and in making vitamin D, bile acid, and vital hormones, such as testosterone and oestrogen.

Glucose

Glucose is a sugar that acts as the body's main source of energy. Most of the body's cells require glucose for energy production. The brain and nervous system cells can only function when glucose levels in the blood remain within a certain range. The hormone insulin controls the transport of glucose into the body's cells to be used as energy. We cannot live without glucose or insulin and they must be in balance. It is important that blood glucose levels remains fairly stable as severe high or low levels can be life threatening.

HbA1c

Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), also known as glycated haemoglobin, is a longer term measure of glucose levels in your blood than a simple blood glucose test. Glucose attaches itself to the haemoglobin in your red blood cells, and as your cells live for around 12-16 weeks, it gives us a good indication of the average level of sugar in your blood over a 3 month period.

Free T4

Thyroxine (T4) is one of two hormones produced by the thyroid gland. It works to speed up the rate of your metabolism. Most T4 is bound to carrier proteins in the blood - it is only the free, or unbound, T4 that is active in the body, which is measured in this test. Free T4 is the less active of the two main thyroid hormones. To have an impact on your cells it needs to convert to the more active T3 when your body needs it.

TSH

Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland in order to regulate the production of thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) by the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormones in the blood are low, then more TSH is produced to stimulate the thyroid gland to produce more of them. If thyroid hormone levels are high, then the pituitary produces less TSH to slow the production of thyroid hormones. If TSH is too high or too low, it normally signifies that there is a problem with the thyroid gland which is causing it to under or over produce thyroid hormones. Sometimes a disorder of the pituitary gland can also cause abnormal TSH levels.

Prolactin

Prolactin is a hormone which is produced in the pituitary gland and plays a role in reproductive health. Its primary purpose is to stimulate milk production after childbirth, and in pregnant and breastfeeding women prolactin levels can soar.

Testosterone

Testosterone is a hormone that causes male characteristics. For men, it helps to regulate sex drive and has a role in controlling bone mass, fat distribution, muscle mass, strength and the production of red blood cells and sperm. Testosterone is produced in the testicles of men and, in much smaller amounts, in the ovaries of women. Testosterone levels in men naturally decline after the age of 30, although lower than normal levels can occur at any age and can cause low libido, erectile dysfunction, difficulty in gaining and maintaining muscle mass and lack of energy. Although women have much lower amounts of testosterone than men, it is important for much the same reasons, playing a role in libido, the distribution of muscle and fat and the formation of red blood cells. All laboratories will slightly differ in the reference ranges they apply because they are based on the population they are testing. The normal range is set so that 95% of men will fall into it. For greater consistency, we use the guidance from the British Society for Sexual Medicine (BSSM) which advises that low testosterone can be diagnosed when testosterone is consistently below the reference range, and that levels below 12 nmol/L could also be considered low, especially in men who also report symptoms of low testosterone or who have low levels of free testosterone.

Free Testosterone

Most testosterone circulating in the blood is bound to proteins, in particular SHBG and albumin; only 2-3 % of testosterone is free and available to cells. This test uses an algorithm to calculate the level of free or unbound testosterone in relation to total testosterone, SHBG and albumin.

FAI

The free androgen index (FAI) is a calculation used to determine the amount of testosterone which is free (unbound) in the bloodstream. Most testosterone is bound to proteins sex hormone binding globulin and albumin and is not available to interact with the body's cells. The FAI is a calculation based on the ratio of testosterone and SHBG and is a measure of the amount of testosterone that is available to act on the body's tissues. The free androgen index is used in women to assess the likelihood of polycystic ovarian syndrome. In men, free testosterone gives a better indication of testosterone status.

PSA

Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is a protein which is released into the blood by the prostate gland. Prostate cancer can raise PSA levels but a PSA test in isolation is not to be relied upon to diagnose prostate cancer, as levels can be raised in benign prostate disorders (a false positive). There is also the potential for PSA levels to be normal despite the presence of prostate cancer, this is called a false negative.

SHBG

SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin) is a protein which transports the sex hormones (testosterone, oestrogen and dihydrotestosterone (DHT)) in the blood.Hormones which are bound to SHBG are inactive which means that they are unavailable to your cells. Measuring the level of SHBG in your blood gives important information about your levels of free or unbound hormones which are biologically active and available for use.

Androstenedione

Androstenedione is an androgen that is responsible for the onset of sexual differentiation in males and females as well as the development of secondary male physical characteristics such as facial hair and a deep voice . It is present in the blood of both men and women and is a precursor that can be converted by the body into more potent androgens, such as testosterone, or converted into the female hormone Oestrogen. This test measures the amount of androstenedione in the blood.

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Patient reception

Our patient reception is located at 42 Foley Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 7TS

Walking distance from Oxford Circus & a number of other underground stations.

Opening hours

Our opening hours are:

Monday to Friday

9.30AM - 7PM

Weekends

Appointment only

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