Antenatal Screen

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How much does it cost?

Please note – In addition to the price of tests, there is also a phlebotomy cost for the withdrawal and handling of your sample. This is a standard charge across all clinics. The cost of sample handling is £50, but this is discounted to £30 only if paid in advance. Please choose the pay later option to pay the full amount upon your arrival at the clinic or choose pay now in order to pay in advance and secure the discounted fee.

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Antenatal Screen
Check for hormones to do with pregnancy
Features:
  • Full Blood Count
  • Blood Group
  • Atypical Antibody Screen
  • Haemoglobin Electrophoresis
  • Syphilis IgM/IgG
  • Glucose
  • Free T4
  • TSH
  • Rubella Antibodies
  • Toxoplasma Antibodies
  • Hepatitis B sAg
  • Hepatitis C Antibodies
  • Varicella Zoster Antibodies
  • HIV 1 & 2

How does it work?

1

Find your test(s)

Browse our tests and profiles. If the test you are looking for is not on our website, contact us for more information. We have 1000+ tests.

2

Book an appointment

Click “book now” & select the date and time. If you do not know which test you need, or if you need multiple tests, select “general appointment”. Pay for your appointment in advance & save £20 on phlebotomy fees.

3

Visit our clinic

Upon arrival at the clinic, our staff will confirm your test selection, and take the samples required to provide you your reports.

4

Receive your results

After analysing your sample in our lab, you will receive a PDF report by email. Most results are available within 24 hours.

What can I learn from this test?

The antenatal profile includes essential tests for protecting and monitoring the health of a pregnant woman and her developing child. Health problems detected by these tests can often be treated during pregnancy or immediately after birth, allowing you and your baby to have a safer pregnancy and stay as healthy as possible.

What can I test?

Full Blood Count

Red cells are vital for transporting oxygen around the body, and anything that affects their ability to do so can lead to symptoms, including fatigue. An FBC looks at the size, shape, and volume of your red blood cells and will help assess whether you are suffering from anaemia, either caused by a deficiency in iron or vitamin B12. White blood cells are key to supporting your body's immune system and can indicate whether you are suffering from or have recently suffered from an injury or infection.

Blood Group

Red blood cells have various proteins on their surface called antigens. There are various types of red blood cell antigens - the ABO and rhesus types are the most important. Different combinations of these types give several different blood groups. There are four main blood groups: A, B, AB and O with each group being either RhD positive or RhD negative, resulting in a total of eight main blood groups. Your genetic make-up which you inherit from your parents determines which antigens occur on your red blood cells and therefore which blood group you are.

Atypical Antibody Screen

Haemoglobin Electrophoresis

Haemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells which carries oxygen around the body and gives the blood its red colour. This test measures the amount of haemoglobin in the blood and is a good measure of the blood's ability to carry oxygen around the body.

Syphilis IgM/IgG

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum, spread through sexual contact. Which is important to test for and treat as the infection can cause a range of health problems if left untreated. Antibodies are produced by the immune system when there is an infection in the body. Checking for syphilis specific antibodies in the body helps to identify an infection.

Glucose

Glucose is a sugar that acts as the body's main source of energy. Most of the body's cells require glucose for energy production. The brain and nervous system cells can only function when glucose levels in the blood remain within a certain range. The hormone insulin controls the transport of glucose into the body's cells to be used as energy. We cannot live without glucose or insulin and they must be in balance. It is important that blood glucose levels remains fairly stable as severe high or low levels can be life threatening.

Free T4

Thyroxine (T4) is one of two hormones produced by the thyroid gland. It works to speed up the rate of your metabolism. Most T4 is bound to carrier proteins in the blood - it is only the free, or unbound, T4 that is active in the body, which is measured in this test. Free T4 is the less active of the two main thyroid hormones. To have an impact on your cells it needs to convert to the more active T3 when your body needs it.

TSH

Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland in order to regulate the production of thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) by the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormones in the blood are low, then more TSH is produced to stimulate the thyroid gland to produce more of them. If thyroid hormone levels are high, then the pituitary produces less TSH to slow the production of thyroid hormones. If TSH is too high or too low, it normally signifies that there is a problem with the thyroid gland which is causing it to under or over produce thyroid hormones. Sometimes a disorder of the pituitary gland can also cause abnormal TSH levels.

Rubella Antibodies

Rubella is a viral infection otherwise known as German Measles. The virus causes a red rash and flu-like symptoms and although the virus is usually harmless, if a woman gets rubella in the first three months of her pregnancy, serious birth defects or a miscarriage may occur.

Toxoplasma Antibodies

Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by the toxoplasma parasite. Infection usually occurs through eating undercooked, contaminated meat or cleaning a cats litter box when the cat has shed Toxoplasma in its faeces. Often those who are infected have very few symptoms because a healthy persons immune system usually keeps the parasite from causing illness. However, those with compromised immune systems and pregnant women should be cautious as an infection can cause serious health problems and affect the unborn child. The body produces Toxoplasma IgG antibodies after being infected by this parasite.

Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

This test measures antibodies against hepatitis B in your blood. It will tell you whether you are immune to hepatitis B or whether you do not have immunity. In most of the population, a result greater than 10 IU/L means that you have sufficient antibodies for immunity. A result less than 10 IU/L means that you are not immune. If you are prone to exposure to hepatitis B through your work (Exposure Prone Procedures a EPP), then you will require a result greater than 100 IU/L to confirm immunity. If your result shows that you have immunity to hepatitis B it means that you are both protected from possible infection and will not pass it on to another person. You can acquire hep B immunity through prior vaccination(s), or by having recovered from a previous infection. This test will not tell you whether you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is an infectious viral disease which causes your liver to become inflamed and enlarged. Most people recover from an acute hepatitis B infection by themselves within around 6 months. However, for others, the infection becomes chronic (prolonged) which can lead to lasting liver damage. Hepatitis B can have few symptoms, especially in the early stages. People who are at risk of becoming infected with hepatitis B are those who have had close contact with others who are infected (including unprotected sexual contact). Coming into contact with infected blood (e.g. through sharing needles, some contact sports) will also put you at risk of becoming infected with hepatitis B. Health care workers are often required to check their immunity against hep B for work purposes.

Hepatitis C Antibodies

Hepatitis C is a virus that can infect and damage the liver. It is mainly transmitted through sharing needles while injecting drugs, through unprotected sex with an infected person and can also be passed from mother to baby. Many who are infected with the virus are unaware as there are often no noticeable symptoms. However, a chronic hepatitis C infection can cause cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) which can lead to chronic liver disease. Hepatitis C antibodies are produced by the body in response to exposure to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Testing for these antibodies in the blood helps to identify a hepatitis C infection.

Varicella Zoster IgG

Varicella Zoster is another name for the virus which causes chickenpox and shingles. It is a type of herpes virus and tends to infect a large proportion of the population at a young age, causing chicken pox, and from there on it lays dormant in the nerve cells. However, in about 25% of people, the virus may reactivate later in life, presenting itself as shingles, a painful blistering rash focussed on one particular area of the body. Testing for the presence of IgG in the blood indicates whether someone has previously been infected and has developed immunity to the virus.

HIV 1 & 2 Abs

HIV antibodies are made by the immune system in response to infection with either Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 or 2. P24 antigen is a protein from the core of the HIV virus, it is found during the initial infection with HIV and disappears following seroconversion. This test will look for the presence of HIV antibodies and p24 antigen in the blood and will report whether they are detected or not.

Full Blood Count

Red cells are vital for transporting oxygen around the body, and anything that affects their ability to do so can lead to symptoms, including fatigue. An FBC looks at the size, shape, and volume of your red blood cells and will help assess whether you are suffering from anaemia, either caused by a deficiency in iron or vitamin B12. White blood cells are key to supporting your body's immune system and can indicate whether you are suffering from or have recently suffered from an injury or infection.

Blood Group

Red blood cells have various proteins on their surface called antigens. There are various types of red blood cell antigens - the ABO and rhesus types are the most important. Different combinations of these types give several different blood groups. There are four main blood groups: A, B, AB and O with each group being either RhD positive or RhD negative, resulting in a total of eight main blood groups. Your genetic make-up which you inherit from your parents determines which antigens occur on your red blood cells and therefore which blood group you are.

Atypical Antibody Screen

Haemoglobin Electrophoresis

Haemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells which carries oxygen around the body and gives the blood its red colour. This test measures the amount of haemoglobin in the blood and is a good measure of the blood's ability to carry oxygen around the body.

Syphilis IgM/IgG

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum, spread through sexual contact. Which is important to test for and treat as the infection can cause a range of health problems if left untreated. Antibodies are produced by the immune system when there is an infection in the body. Checking for syphilis specific antibodies in the body helps to identify an infection.

Glucose

Glucose is a sugar that acts as the body's main source of energy. Most of the body's cells require glucose for energy production. The brain and nervous system cells can only function when glucose levels in the blood remain within a certain range. The hormone insulin controls the transport of glucose into the body's cells to be used as energy. We cannot live without glucose or insulin and they must be in balance. It is important that blood glucose levels remains fairly stable as severe high or low levels can be life threatening.

Free T4

Thyroxine (T4) is one of two hormones produced by the thyroid gland. It works to speed up the rate of your metabolism. Most T4 is bound to carrier proteins in the blood - it is only the free, or unbound, T4 that is active in the body, which is measured in this test. Free T4 is the less active of the two main thyroid hormones. To have an impact on your cells it needs to convert to the more active T3 when your body needs it.

TSH

Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland in order to regulate the production of thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) by the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormones in the blood are low, then more TSH is produced to stimulate the thyroid gland to produce more of them. If thyroid hormone levels are high, then the pituitary produces less TSH to slow the production of thyroid hormones. If TSH is too high or too low, it normally signifies that there is a problem with the thyroid gland which is causing it to under or over produce thyroid hormones. Sometimes a disorder of the pituitary gland can also cause abnormal TSH levels.

Rubella Antibodies

Rubella is a viral infection otherwise known as German Measles. The virus causes a red rash and flu-like symptoms and although the virus is usually harmless, if a woman gets rubella in the first three months of her pregnancy, serious birth defects or a miscarriage may occur.

Toxoplasma Antibodies

Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by the toxoplasma parasite. Infection usually occurs through eating undercooked, contaminated meat or cleaning a cats litter box when the cat has shed Toxoplasma in its faeces. Often those who are infected have very few symptoms because a healthy persons immune system usually keeps the parasite from causing illness. However, those with compromised immune systems and pregnant women should be cautious as an infection can cause serious health problems and affect the unborn child. The body produces Toxoplasma IgG antibodies after being infected by this parasite.

Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

This test measures antibodies against hepatitis B in your blood. It will tell you whether you are immune to hepatitis B or whether you do not have immunity. In most of the population, a result greater than 10 IU/L means that you have sufficient antibodies for immunity. A result less than 10 IU/L means that you are not immune. If you are prone to exposure to hepatitis B through your work (Exposure Prone Procedures a EPP), then you will require a result greater than 100 IU/L to confirm immunity. If your result shows that you have immunity to hepatitis B it means that you are both protected from possible infection and will not pass it on to another person. You can acquire hep B immunity through prior vaccination(s), or by having recovered from a previous infection. This test will not tell you whether you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is an infectious viral disease which causes your liver to become inflamed and enlarged. Most people recover from an acute hepatitis B infection by themselves within around 6 months. However, for others, the infection becomes chronic (prolonged) which can lead to lasting liver damage. Hepatitis B can have few symptoms, especially in the early stages. People who are at risk of becoming infected with hepatitis B are those who have had close contact with others who are infected (including unprotected sexual contact). Coming into contact with infected blood (e.g. through sharing needles, some contact sports) will also put you at risk of becoming infected with hepatitis B. Health care workers are often required to check their immunity against hep B for work purposes.

Hepatitis C Antibodies

Hepatitis C is a virus that can infect and damage the liver. It is mainly transmitted through sharing needles while injecting drugs, through unprotected sex with an infected person and can also be passed from mother to baby. Many who are infected with the virus are unaware as there are often no noticeable symptoms. However, a chronic hepatitis C infection can cause cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) which can lead to chronic liver disease. Hepatitis C antibodies are produced by the body in response to exposure to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Testing for these antibodies in the blood helps to identify a hepatitis C infection.

Varicella Zoster IgG

Varicella Zoster is another name for the virus which causes chickenpox and shingles. It is a type of herpes virus and tends to infect a large proportion of the population at a young age, causing chicken pox, and from there on it lays dormant in the nerve cells. However, in about 25% of people, the virus may reactivate later in life, presenting itself as shingles, a painful blistering rash focussed on one particular area of the body. Testing for the presence of IgG in the blood indicates whether someone has previously been infected and has developed immunity to the virus.

HIV 1 & 2 Abs

HIV antibodies are made by the immune system in response to infection with either Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 or 2. P24 antigen is a protein from the core of the HIV virus, it is found during the initial infection with HIV and disappears following seroconversion. This test will look for the presence of HIV antibodies and p24 antigen in the blood and will report whether they are detected or not.

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How do i find you?

Patient reception

Our patient reception is located at 42 Foley Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 7TS

Walking distance from Oxford Circus & a number of other underground stations.

Opening hours

Our opening hours are:

Monday to Friday

9.30AM - 7PM

Weekends

Appointment only

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