Advanced Vitamin Screen

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How much does it cost?

Please note – In addition to the price of tests, there is also a phlebotomy cost for the withdrawal and handling of your sample. This is a standard charge across all clinics. The cost of sample handling is £50, but this is discounted to £30 only if paid in advance. Please choose the pay later option to pay the full amount upon your arrival at the clinic or choose pay now in order to pay in advance and secure the discounted fee.

MOST POPULAR
Vitamin Screen
Screen of the most common Vitamins.
Features:
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin D (25-OH)
  • Vitamin E
MOST POPULAR
Advanced Vitamin Screen
Comprehensive screen of the most common Vitamins.
Features:
  • Vitamin A
  • Beta - carotene
  • Vitamin B1
  • Vitamin B2
  • Vitamin B3
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B9
  • Vitamin B12 (Active)
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin E

How does it work?

1

Find your test(s)

Browse our tests and profiles. If the test you are looking for is not on our website, contact us for more information. We have 1000+ tests.

2

Book an appointment

Click “book now” & select the date and time. If you do not know which test you need, or if you need multiple tests, select “general appointment”. Pay for your appointment in advance & save £20 on phlebotomy fees.

3

Visit our clinic

Upon arrival at the clinic, our staff will confirm your test selection, and take the samples required to provide you your reports.

4

Receive your results

After analysing your sample in our lab, you will receive a PDF report by email. Most results are available within 24 hours.

What is included in this test?

A comprehensive blood test to measure your levels of vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B12, D, E, beta carotene and red cell folate.

What can I test?

Vitamin A

Vitamin A (retinol) is a fat-soluble vitamin found in animal products such as eggs, dairy, liver and kidneys. It is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and foetus.

Beta - carotene

Beta-carotene is a fat-soluble carotenoid found in plants, and is what gives carrots their orange colour. Your body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A (retinol) and is a safe source of vitamin A because your body only converts as much as it needs. Excess vitamin A can be toxic. Vitamin A is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and fetus. Beta-carotene is also an antioxidant so protects the body from damaging free radicals. Sources of beta-carotene include carrots, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, sweet potatoes, squash and broccoli.

Vitamin B1

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells. Thiamine (B1) is a water-soluble vitamin required to form adenosine triphosphate which all cells in the body need.

Vitamin B2

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.

Vitamin B3

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.

Vitamin B6

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.

Red Cell Folate

Folate is a B vitamin which acts as a coenzyme in the metabolism of amino acids. It is also vital for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines which are essential for DNA synthesis and red cell formation. Folate is also especially important during the first trimester of pregnancy so if you are thinking of becoming pregnant it is important to make sure your folate levels are normal. Red Cell Folate is a measure of the body's store of the vitamin folate.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is important for production of red blood cells which carry oxygen around the body. B12 is also involved in metabolism and the nervous system and prolonged lack of vitamin B12 may cause nerve damage. Although Vitamin B12 is almost entirely found in animal-based foods, many vegetarian and vegan products, especially plant milks are now fortified with Vitamin B12.

Vitamin D

Although called a vitamin, vitamin D is actually a hormone which is activated by sunshine on your skin. Vitamin D is essential for bone strength as it helps your intestines absorb calcium. However, it is thought that vitamin D also plays an important role in immune function, as well as in many chronic diseases and mental health. Many people in the UK have low levels of vitamin D with symptoms including muscle weakness, mood swings and fatigue. People who have dark skin, as well as those who don't spend much time outdoors are particularly at risk of low vitamin D. Small amounts of vitamin D can be obtained from food, especially oily fish, eggs and any food which has been fortified with vitamin D. If you are deficient in vitamin D you are unlikely to be able to improve your levels by food alone.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an antioxidant important in protecting body tissue from damage caused by unstable substances called free radicals, which are produced by cigarette smoke, sunlight, pollution and chemical reactions in the body. Vitamin E is also important in the formation of red blood cells, keeping the immune system healthy and helps the body to use vitamin K.

Haematocrit

HCT (haematocrit) measures the amount of space (volume) within the blood that is taken up by red blood cells.

MCHC

MCHC (mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration) is the average concentration of haemoglobin in your red blood cells. Haemoglobin is a molecule which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen around the body.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A (retinol) is a fat-soluble vitamin found in animal products such as eggs, dairy, liver and kidneys. It is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and foetus.

Beta - carotene

Beta-carotene is a fat-soluble carotenoid found in plants, and is what gives carrots their orange colour. Your body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A (retinol) and is a safe source of vitamin A because your body only converts as much as it needs. Excess vitamin A can be toxic. Vitamin A is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and fetus. Beta-carotene is also an antioxidant so protects the body from damaging free radicals. Sources of beta-carotene include carrots, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, sweet potatoes, squash and broccoli.

Vitamin B1

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells. Thiamine (B1) is a water-soluble vitamin required to form adenosine triphosphate which all cells in the body need.

Vitamin B2

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.

Vitamin B3

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.

Vitamin B6

The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.

Red Cell Folate

Folate is a B vitamin which acts as a coenzyme in the metabolism of amino acids. It is also vital for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines which are essential for DNA synthesis and red cell formation. Folate is also especially important during the first trimester of pregnancy so if you are thinking of becoming pregnant it is important to make sure your folate levels are normal. Red Cell Folate is a measure of the body's store of the vitamin folate.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is important for production of red blood cells which carry oxygen around the body. B12 is also involved in metabolism and the nervous system and prolonged lack of vitamin B12 may cause nerve damage. Although Vitamin B12 is almost entirely found in animal-based foods, many vegetarian and vegan products, especially plant milks are now fortified with Vitamin B12.

Vitamin D

Although called a vitamin, vitamin D is actually a hormone which is activated by sunshine on your skin. Vitamin D is essential for bone strength as it helps your intestines absorb calcium. However, it is thought that vitamin D also plays an important role in immune function, as well as in many chronic diseases and mental health. Many people in the UK have low levels of vitamin D with symptoms including muscle weakness, mood swings and fatigue. People who have dark skin, as well as those who don't spend much time outdoors are particularly at risk of low vitamin D. Small amounts of vitamin D can be obtained from food, especially oily fish, eggs and any food which has been fortified with vitamin D. If you are deficient in vitamin D you are unlikely to be able to improve your levels by food alone.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an antioxidant important in protecting body tissue from damage caused by unstable substances called free radicals, which are produced by cigarette smoke, sunlight, pollution and chemical reactions in the body. Vitamin E is also important in the formation of red blood cells, keeping the immune system healthy and helps the body to use vitamin K.

Haematocrit

HCT (haematocrit) measures the amount of space (volume) within the blood that is taken up by red blood cells.

MCHC

MCHC (mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration) is the average concentration of haemoglobin in your red blood cells. Haemoglobin is a molecule which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen around the body.

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How do i find you?

Patient reception

Our patient reception is located at 42 Foley Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 7TS

Walking distance from Oxford Circus & a number of other underground stations.

Opening hours

Our opening hours are:

Monday to Friday

9.30AM - 7PM

Weekends

Appointment only

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